Never, Ever Say “Process”

pro·cess

noun \ˈprä-ˌses, ˈprō-, -səs\

a series of actions or operations conducing to an end; especially : a continuous operation or treatment especially in manufacture.

Words are an amazing thing.  Words create images and communicate intent.  They have the power to strengthen and the power to weaken.  With software, the most divisive word is Process.  It truly is the demotivator of teams and can suck the life out of developers in an instant.
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At-Launch Linux Hardware Enablement

The Linux market presents some unique challenges to Independent Hardware Vendors (IHVs) in bringing their products to market with broad support available at the time of launch.  Independent of ideological or pragmatic rationale, both Open Source and proprietary drivers are constrained by similar mechanics.  This article provides a broad outline of the mechanics and considerations that are needed for delivering hardware support at-launch.

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All Projects Great and Small

Projects come in all shapes and sizes. However there is a human tendency to begin to look for consistency in the way projects are run. If there is the possibility to make all the projects look the same and be approximately the same size, then we’ll force them to the same size. In my particular domain, software projects will aggregate sub projects until they get to a particular size that warrants an organization’s standard project methodology.  This has a number of possibly unintended consequences that bear consideration.
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Engaging User Communities: Lessons from webOS

This was presented at the Embedded Linux Conference in April 2010.  This was different than other presentations that I have done in that it is virtually word free and is more of the talking point model.

A PDF is available.

The Five Stages of Benchmark Loss

This presentation was presented at Scale8x in Los Angeles in February, 2010.  It was primarily a vent piece highlighting the way that you can never win when running benchmarks and you can never win when publishing benchmarks.

Presentationad and audio available.